Tag Archives: Surgery

Facial Reconstruction through 3D Scan, Print

UK Doctors are reverse engineering and reconstructing a man’s face, thanks to 3D technologies. Warning – some images could be graphic.

Eric Moger lost half of his face to cancer and as a result could no longer eat, drink or speak.  Doctors scanned his face and mirrored the “good” side over the “bad.”  The result is a model of the face very similar to how it used to look.  From that the team of doctors was able to develop a prosthesis that allows the patient use of his mouth again.

For the first time in five years, Eric Moger is able to speak clearly without holding his mouth, eat without a feeding tube, and hold his head high while going to the pub with his friends.

In the words of Mr. Moger, himself, “It is a great feeling to look in the mirror and see a whole face again. I am amazed at what they have done  – it just looks so like me. I also have something to look forward to, as Karen and I are planning to finally get married this summer.’

Mr MogerMr Moger

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75% of Skull Replaced Due to 3D Printed Plastic Implants

Thanks to FDA approval of the process just last February 18th, Oxford Performance Materials replaced 75% of a patient’s skull using a 3D printed replica as an implant.

They were able to take a digital scan of the patient’s skull and turn it into a 3D plastic part.  This plastic was printed so that the edges had very high porous detail, allowing for the bones to grow into and fuse to the plastic.  This allows for lower chance of rejection and an overall stronger new skull than traditional implants.

Skull

The plastic is a high performance medical grade polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) developed by Oxford Performance Materials for the EOS P800, a plastic selective laser sintering (SLS) machine.  Selective laser sintering fuses layers of thermoplastics together using an extremely precise laser.

Immediately, the company envisions that 300 to 500  patients could use this implant every month in the United States alone.

But don’t just stop at skulls.  OPM’s president, Scott DeFelice says, “If you can replace a bony void in someone’s head next to the brain, you have a pretty good platform for filling bony voids elsewhere.”

The company is submitting for FDA approval of bone implants for many other parts of the body.  Each individual bone, including the skull, could be between a 50 and 100 million dollar market.

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3D Printed Toddler?!

Working at a 3D printing facility can be very entertaining. The employees at Objet get to live and work with the models they create like this fully-sized, precisely-scaled human toddler (minus legs) – complete with visible internal bone structure! This anatomical model gives us a glimpse into the future of 3D printing in the medical industry. Surgeons in training can use these models to hone their skills before operating on actual patients, crime scene investigators can recreate how a victim’s blood splatter pattern was created, car companies can see how high speed collisions affect  bone and internal organs; the possibilities are amazing (and fun)!!

Check out the article here!

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3D printing assists in Belgium’s first full-face transplant!

A 65-strong medical team at Ghent University Hospital, headed by Phillip Blondeel, performed Belgium’s first full-face transplant. This was the world’s nineteenth face transplant, but it was the first time that the procedure was planned digitally. Engineers used a model from a CT scan to examine the patient’s defects so they could 3D print anatomically correct models of what healthy bones in the patients’s face should look like. The printed “guides” were then used as a reference during the surgery, sitting on the donor’s face so the surgeon knew exactly where to cut.

Check out the full article here!

full face 3d repair

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